Bodies from the Bog

 

 

An Irish bog

 

Chapter 1

The Grauballe Man
  • a bog mummy discovered in Denmark in 1952, 4 photos of his discovery.

Chapter 2

The Porsmose Man
  • a bog skeleton discovered in Denmark in 1946, 1 photo. He was killed by arrows. The photograph in the book shows his skull and an arrowhead that pierced his nasal cavity. The arrow that killed him, however, penetrated his aorta. A fascinating, unforgettable photo.

The Borremose Man

  • a bog mummy discovered in Denmark in 1946, 1 photograph.

The Osterby Head

  • a bog skull discovered in Germany in 1948, 1 photograph. Known for its Swabian-knot hairstyle.

The Tollund Man

  • a bog mummy discovered in Denmark in 1952, 2 photos. Perhaps the most famous of all bog bodies.

The Zweeloo Woman

  • a bog skeleton (with skin and intestines) discovered in the Netherlands in 1951, 2 photographs.

The Windeby Girl

  • a bog mummy discovered in Germany in 1952, 1 photo. Half of her head had been shaved and she had been blindfolded.

Chapter 3

The Emmer-Erfscheidenveen Man
  • a bog mummy discovered in the Netherlands.

Chapter 4

The Gundestrup Cauldron
  • a cauldron most likely used in sacrificial rituals, discovered in Denmark in 1891, 2 photographs.

The Dejbjerg Wagons

  • two unusual wagons most likely used in sacrificial rituals, discovered in Denmark in the 1880s, 1 photograph.

The Weerdinge Men

  • two bog mummies discovered in the Netherlands in 1904, 1 photograph. One was found with its intestines on its abdomen: a possible sacrifice?

The Caergwrle Bowl

  • a carved stone bowl, in the shape of a boat, discovered in Wales in the 1820s, 1 photograph. Possibly offered to the gods as thanks.

The Clonmacnoise Collar

  • a stunning golden torc or collar discovered in an Irish bog, 1 photograph. Another offering made to the gods.

Chapter 5

The Lindow Man
  • a bog mummy discovered in England in 1983, 2 photographs. One of the most recent discoveries, now on display in the British Museum.

The Meenybradden Woman

  • a bog mummy recently discovered in Ireland, 1 photograph. Her cloak has caused a small controversy.

The Borremose Woman

  • a bog mummy discovered in Denmark in 1848, 1 photograph. She was the victim of considerable violence.

The Dätgen Man

  • a bog body and skull discovered in Germany, 2 photographs. His head had been detached and buried near the body.

The Yde Girl

  • a bog mummy discovered in the Netherlands in 1897, 2 photographs including her face as reconstructed by an artist. The bog dredger who discovered her thought she was the Devil, because she appeared to have red hair.

Chapter 6

The Tollund Man
  • another photograph showing his permanent resting place in the Silkeborg Museum in Silkeborg, Denmark.

The Windeby Girl

  • another photograph showing her permanent resting place in the Landsmuseum in Schleswig, Germany

The Grauballe Man

  • another photograph showing his permanent resting place in the Moesgård Museum of Prehistory near Aarhus, Denmark.

Acknowledgments, Bibliography, Index

 

If you're interested in reading more about bog bodies or other mummies, visit the Recommended Mummy Book page at the Mummy Tombs.

Or if you are interested in seeing bog bodies as displayed in various museums in Europe, visit the Bog Mummies page at The Mummy Tombs.

 

Bodies from the Bog. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. Houghton Mifflin paperback edition, 2003.

 

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Bodies from the Bog

 

 

 

 

Unless otherwise noted, all contents ©James M. Deem, 1988-2013. 

For permission to quote from or reproduce this material, please contact James M. Deem.

Be sure to visit James M. Deem's other website, The Mummy Tombs, for the most mummy information on the Internet.

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